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Thoughts on Thursday

Fall Math Fun!

In honor of the autumn season, I have created a number decomposing activity to help my firsties with ways to make numbers consisting of trees and leaves!!
I call it....

Number Expression Trees!!!

Yeah, not such a fancy or cutesy name, but hey! It gets the point across.



This activity involves decomposing numbers 5 through 10. Children write facts on leaves, then glue leaves to the properly numbered tree. There is a recording page for accountability.
My kids did this as a cut and paste activity where they came up with the expressions, wrote them on colored leaves, and then glued them to the right tree. I unfortunately was not there that day, but my associate teacher told me that they had so much fun! Their finished trees were so cute and so correct!! 

You could also color the trees, make multiple copies of the leaves and color them, and write the facts on the leaves, then laminate the pieces and place in a center.

If you would like this free activity, click on over here!!!

Let me know what you think!! Thanks!!!
Jessica


Here are the Common Core State Standards associated with this activity: 

CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.B.3 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.2Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.B.4 Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.C.5 Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.C.6 Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.D.7 Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

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